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How much would you pay out-of-pocket for a five day hospital stay on Medicare? The majority of people have no idea! The problem with Medicare is there is too much information. An overwhelming amount of information and not enough resources. Medicare Nation solves that problem by educating you on all things Medicare, because there are not enough resources out there! This podcast will educate you about the components of Medicare, the different categories of Medicare Plans and Medicare benefits. On other episodes I’ll interview expert guests in the health and wellness field, about diseases, Medicare issues and current changes to the Medicare program. Medicare Nation is dedicated to answering all your questions about Medicare. Expert information and insights regarding Medicare and you! Further information can be found on www.callsamm.com Give us feedback on Facebook! www.facebook.com/MedicareNation
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Now displaying: February, 2016
Feb 27, 2016

Do you know how your Medicare benefits would be affected by the changes in government that would come from a new President? It's time to think about it and weigh in on what you think is best for you and for the country. Listen as Diane talks to real people who have an opinion. 

Do you have questions or feedback? I’d love to hear it!

 

email me:

support@themedicarenation.com

Thank you for listening! If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe and leave a 5 star rating and review in iTunes! (Click here)    

 

Find out more information about Medicare on Diane Daniel’s website!

 www.CallSamm.com

 

 

Feb 19, 2016

Welcome, Medicare Nation! Today’s guest is Lee Silverstein, who is a colon cancer survivor. Lee is here to discuss the risks, prevalence, and treatments for this disease. Colorectal cancer is the most commonly diagnosed but also the most preventable through proper screening. The American Cancer Society estimates that 95,000 people will be newly diagnosed with colon cancer in 2016. Over their lifetimes, 1 in 21 men and 1 in 23 women will be diagnosed! Colon cancer is clearly not “the old man’s disease” that many of us have been led to believe. Let’s hear Lee’s amazing story!

  • Why has colon cancer become so widespread for people under age 40?

“Over the last few years, the rates for diagnosis have remained steady, with a huge increase in the number of cases in people under age 40. It is scary, alarming, and unexplainable by doctors. I recently attended a conference on colon cancer and met a newly diagnosed 23-year-old. The common risk factors are being overweight, a lack of physical activity, a diet rich in red meat, heavy smoking and alcohol use. Keep in mind that you can have NONE of these risk factors and still be diagnosed with the disease, like what happened to me.”

 

  • Would you mind telling our Medicare Nation listeners your personal story?

“Not at all—I would love to share my story. I had NO risk factors and had just turned 50, living a very health-conscious life. I exercised regularly and was eating smart. I had a colonoscopy in March 2011, and the doctor couldn’t get the scope where he needed it to go. I wasn’t alarmed, but received a call from the doctor two days later saying I had a tumor in my transverse colon. This colonoscopy saved my life!”

 

  • Would you share what your treatment was?

“I had colon cancer and needed to have the tumor removed; the surgeon was confident that he could remove it all. My cancer was classified as Stage 2, which meant it was borderline as to whether there were benefits to undergoing chemotherapy. I got three opinions and determined that the benefits of chemo did NOT outweigh the risk. My follow-up exam included a CT scan and bloodwork, which showed a small spot on my liver. A biopsy was ordered and showed that my colon cancer had spread to my liver, even though it was a small spot and slow-growing. Surgery was recommended and chemotherapy. I went to Sloan-Kettering, which was the hospital I had been treated at as a child when I had a rare kidney cancer. The liver surgeon there was confident that I would be fine. Surgery was scheduled for January 2013 and I finished chemo treatments in August. In 2014, two small spots on my lungs were discovered. The doctor suspected that it was colon cancer that had metastasized to my lungs. He wanted to treat it with SBRT, a cyberknife-type targeted radiation procedure. In normal radiation, low doses are given over a wide area over a long period of time, with damage to the surrounding tissue. In this procedure, pinpointed high doses are given over a short time. I had the treatment with no side effects, and was even able to continue training for a race. The one spot disappeared and the other shrunk significantly. I’m not cancer-free, but I am stable. The goal of colon cancer treatment is to make it a chronic manageable disease.”

 

  • Can you tell Medicare Nation listeners about the Colon Cancer Alliance?

“I found this organization when I was first diagnosed. They are the largest patient support non-profit organization for colon cancer, based in Washington, DC. They do research and provide online support.”

 

  • Medicare  provides several levels of preventive care and testing for colon cancer:
    • Barium enema is allowed every 24 or 48 months, depending on the risk.
    • Colonoscopy is allowed every 120 or 48 months, depending on the risk.
    • Fecal blood tests are allowed every 12 months.
    • Flexible sigmoidoscopy is allowed every 48 months for people over 50.
    • Multitargeted DNA test is allowed every 3 years for people aged 50-85. This is a new test with many stipulations.
    • Plans, coverage, and co-payments differ.
    • Some procedures are free, but related surgical procedures (like to remove polyps) are NOT free.
  • Tell our listeners about your podcast.

“I started The Colon Cancer Podcast about a year ago. I interview survivors, caregivers, and medical professionals. We share stories of struggle, hope, and survival in the face of colorectal cancer.”

 

  • Tell us about the “Undie Run.”

“These are 5K events sponsored by the Colon Cancer Alliance. We run around in our underwear! Events are held 2-3 times each month, in different cities around the country from February through October. The events are to raise funds and raise awareness of the disease.”

Resources:

www.ccalliance.org

877-422-2030

Find the Facebook group: Blue Hope Nation

Special Bonus! Stay tuned to the entire show where Diane Daniels answers listener questions after the interview!

Do you have questions or feedback? I’d love to hear it!

 

email me:

support@themedicarenation.com

Thank you for listening! If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe and leave a 5 star rating and review in iTunes! (Click here)    

 

Find out more information about Medicare on Diane Daniel’s website!

 www.CallSamm.com

 

Feb 12, 2016

Welcome, Medicare Nation! My guest today is Dr. Andrea Singer, who is a professor of  Obstetrics and Gynecology at Georgetown University Medical Center. Dr. Singer is the Director of Women’s Primary Care and the Director of the Bone Densitometry program. She is a trustee and clinical director for the National Osteoporosis Foundation and a national lecturer on the subject. Dr. Singer has published extensively on many women’s issues and is active in the education of medical students and residents at Georgetown University Medical Center. Dr. Singer is here to teach us about osteoporosis and how it affects our lives and health.

  • Can you define osteoporosis for Medicare Nation listeners?

“Yes—I value this opportunity and hope it can be a call to action for your listeners. Osteoporosis is a disease of the bones in which too much bone is lost or the body simply makes too little bone. The bones become weak and can break from minor falls or simple actions, even like bumping into furniture or sneezing!”

  • How prevalent is osteoporosis in the US?

“It’s a very common disease and I’ll give you some statistics: 50% of people age 50 or older (54 million of the 99 million) have either osteoporosis or low bone mass. The number jumps to 65% of people age 65 or older who are at risk for broken bones.”

  • Do these numbers apply to both genders, or just to women?

“They apply to both genders, even though it’s commonly thought of as a woman’s disease. Interestingly, men have a harder time recovering after a broken bone incident. Of the population age 50 or older, 1 in 2 women and 1 in 4 men will break a bone due to osteoporosis in their remaining years.”

  • What are the risk factors for osteoporosis?

“Risk factors can be broken into two categories: non-modifiable and modifiable factors. Non-modifiable risk factors are those that you can’t control, like age, gender, family history, low body weight/frame, and previous bone fractures. Modifiable risk factors include lack of calcium/vitamin D, inactive lifestyle, smoking, and too much alcohol. Regarding previous fractures, those of the spine, hip, wrist, shoulder, and pelvis are classic osteoporosis fractures. Also, certain medications for other disorders can increase bone loss. If you have these risk factors, you should speak to your health care provider and ask about being evaluated for osteoporosis.”

  • How is osteoporosis diagnosed?

“Doctors will look at risk factors and do physical exams and lab tests, but the only real way to find osteoporosis is to do a bone density test. The lower the bone density, the greater the risk will be. The DXA scan is the bone density test, and is covered under the Welcome to Medicare package for women. Men are not covered for this test unless they fall into one of the following categories: on long-term steroid therapy, diagnosed with hyperparathyroidism, already on osteoporosis therapy, or has a vertebral abnormality or deformity found on an x-ray. The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends that men be screened at age 70, but the bone density test isn’t covered unless one of the four criteria is met.”

  • Why are there not many people being screened for osteoporosis?

“Osteoporosis is under diagnosed, under recognized, and under treated. It’s thought of as ‘my grandmother’s disease,’ and many people don’t recognize the risk factors. In addition, there are fewer health providers doing DXA scans. For many, they lack the realization that broken bones over age 50 is a strong indicator of osteoporosis. We need to raise awareness so that people who are candidates for osteoporosis will get tested. I hope that this discussion empowers people to take charge of their bone health, be proactive and advocate for yourself to your doctor.”

  • How is the medical community treating osteoporosis?

“People need to get adequate calcium and vitamin D, either through diet or supplements. Weight-bearing, muscle-strengthening exercise can help stimulate the bones to remodel themselves and reduces the risk for falls. Fall prevention is a big part of treatment, and there are medications that can slow the bone breakdown or build new bone.”

  • What are the options for osteoporosis medications?

“Prescription pills can be taken daily, weekly, or monthly. These are covered under Medicare Part D. Injections can be given daily, once yearly, or 4x/year; these are covered under Medicare Part B or Part A, depending on where they are administered. The important point is that there is a medication to fit everyone who is at risk.”

  • Where can Medicare Nation listeners go for more information and resources?

Visit the website of the National Osteoporosis Foundation: www.nof.org. You can also find the Foundation on Twitter: @osteoporosisnof or on Facebook. There is also a new app available on iTunes or Google Play: Food4Bones. Check out these valuable resources for more information!

 

Do you have questions or feedback? I’d love to hear it!

 

email me:

support@themedicarenation.com

Thank you for listening! If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe and leave a 5 star rating and review in iTunes! (Click here)    

 

Find out more information about Medicare on Diane Daniel’s website!

 www.CallSamm.com

 

Feb 5, 2016

 

 

Welcome Medicare Nation! I have some alerts for your today for some important changes to Medicare that are going on right now. I want you to know if you are affected, and what you need to do to make sure you have coverage. There are 2 main topics we need to discuss today:

 

  1. Dis-Enrolling from Medicare Advantage Plan
  2. Cigna Suspension

 

 

 

Jan 1- Feb 14 - the period in which you can dis-enroll from your Medicare Advantage plan - if you don’t like it.

 

  • You cannot then switch to another Medicare Advantage Plan during this period
  • You would only be able to go back to original Medicare when you disenroll
  • You would have Part A and Part B
  • This means you have deductibles and co-insurance
  • There is no network - any provider contracted with Medicare will work for you
  • Part B deductibles are either $104.90 or $121.80, depending on your situation
  • Part A deductibles are $1288 for each new occurrence during the coverage period
  • First 60 days you are covered by the deductible
  • Day 61-90 you pay co-insurance of $322/day
  • Day 91-100 you pay $644/day
  • After that you have your 60 lifetime reserve days at $644/day also
  • Part B has annual deductible of $166 for 2016
  • After the deductible you pay 20% of Medicare allowable cost for every procedure
  • You can purchase a Medicare Supplement plan for which you would pay a monthly premium

 

Need Help?

 

 

 

Cigna Suspension:

 

The States - AL, AZ, FL, GA, NC, PA, SC, TN - are affected. They cannot enroll any new people for the plan. If you had it, you can stay on it. Or you can leave. This was a sanction from CMS for failing to comply with the Medicare Standards. They found that Cigna has a long standing history of non-compliance with CMS standards. The suspension is indefinite.

 

This sanction opens a “Special Enrollment Period”. This allows you to enroll in a different Medicare Plan. 

 

Need Help?

Contact Medicare - 1-800-633-4227

Medicare Website - www.medicare.gov/contacts

support@themedicarenation.com

 

Do you have questions or feedback? I’d love to hear it!

 

email me:

support@themedicarenation.com

Thank you for listening! If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe and leave a 5 star rating and review in iTunes! (Click here)    

 

Find out more information about Medicare on Diane Daniel’s website!

 www.CallSamm.com

 

 

 

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