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How much would you pay out-of-pocket for a five day hospital stay on Medicare? The majority of people have no idea! The problem with Medicare is there is too much information. An overwhelming amount of information and not enough resources. Medicare Nation solves that problem by educating you on all things Medicare, because there are not enough resources out there! This podcast will educate you about the components of Medicare, the different categories of Medicare Plans and Medicare benefits. On other episodes I’ll interview expert guests in the health and wellness field, about diseases, Medicare issues and current changes to the Medicare program. Medicare Nation is dedicated to answering all your questions about Medicare. Expert information and insights regarding Medicare and you! Further information can be found on www.callsamm.com Give us feedback on Facebook! www.facebook.com/MedicareNation
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Now displaying: March, 2017
Mar 17, 2017

Hey Medicare Nation!

March is colon cancer awareness month!

Medicare offers different types of "preventative" tests and exams, which aid in diagnosing illnesses and diseases, such as colon cancer.

Always speak with your primary care physician or specialist doctor, to discuss your medical history, family history regarding illness and diseases, as well as any signs & symptoms you may have.

This will assist your physician in determining which type of "preventative" test or exam, is best for you.

A special "Thank You," goes out to Phillip, from Kenosha, Wisconsin, who asks the question:

"I don't like going through a colonoscopy. Are other options available and how often do I need one?"

Let's look at Medicare's official website, to find out more about "preventative" Colo rectal cancer screenings.

www.medicare.gov

 

How often is it covered?

Medicare Part B covers several types of colo rectal cancer screening tests to help find precancerous growths or find cancer early, when treatment is most effective. One or more of these tests may be covered:

 

  • Screening barium enema:When this test is used instead of a flexible sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy, Medicare covers it once every 48 months if you're 50 or over and once every 24 months if you're at high risk for colorectal cancer.
  • Screening colonoscopy: Medicare covers this test once every 24 months if you're at high risk for colorectal cancer. If you aren't at high risk for colorectal cancer, Medicare covers this test once every 120 months (ten years), or… 48 months after a previous flexible sigmoidoscopy.
  • Screening fecal occult blood test: Medicare covers this lab test once every 12 months if you're 50 or older.
  • Multi-target stool DNA test: Medicare covers this at-home test once every 3 years for people who meet allof these conditions:
  •  
    • The Medicare Beneficiary is between 50–85.
    • show no signs or symptoms of colorectal disease including, but not limited to, lower gastrointestinal pain, blood in stool, positive guaiac fecal occult blood test or fecal immunochemical test.
    • They’re at average risk for developing colorectal cancer, meaning:
      • They have no personal history of adenomatous polyps, colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn’s Disease and ulcerative colitis.
      • They have no family history of colorectal cancers or adenomatous polyps, familial adenomatous polyposis, or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.
    • Screening flexible sigmoidoscopy: Medicare covers this test once every 48 months for most people 50 or older. If you aren't at high risk, Medicare covers this test 120 months (ten years) after a previous screening colonoscopy.

 

Who's eligible?

All people age 50 or older with Part B are covered.

People of any age are eligible for a colonoscopy.

 

Your costs in Original Medicare

  • For barium enemas, you pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount for the doctor's services. In a hospital outpatient setting, you also pay a co-payment or co-insurance
  • You pay nothing for a multi-target stool DNA test.
  • You pay nothing for the screening colonoscopy or screening flexible sigmoidoscopy, if your doctor accepts assignment (contracted with Medicare or is an out-of-network physician who accepts assignment).
  • If a screening colonoscopy or screening flexible sigmoidoscopy results in the biopsy or removal of a lesion or growth during the same visit, the procedure is considered diagnostic and you may have to pay co-insurance and/or a co-payment, but the Part B deductible doesn't apply.
  • You pay nothing for the screening fecal occult blood test. This screening test is covered if you get a referral from your doctor, physician assistant, nurse practitioner, or clinical nurse specialist.

 

 Early detection of cancer is critical to successful treatment and may prove to be life-saving!

Get your preventative colorectal screening done as soon as your physician recommends it!

 

Thank you for listening to Medicare Nation!

If you are part of my “Sandwich Generation,” Share this show with your parents and/or grandparents. They have many questions about Medicare and this show will answer them! Buy them a “Smart Phone,” and introduce them to Medicare Nation!

If you are a Baby Boomer, share Medicare Nation with other “Baby Boomers.” I want to educate as many of you as I can about Medicare! I certainly can use  your help in putting the word out!

If you have any questions, send them to Support@TheMedicareNation.com

If I can answer it in one email - I will personally answer you!

If your question requires research or additional contact with you, I do offer consulting if you would like me to assist you in that manner.

Want to hear a topic on Medicare Nation? A special guest? Let me know and I'll do my best to get them on the show!

Thanks again for listening!

 

Mar 10, 2017

Hey Medicare Nation!

I receive many phone calls from clients, who say they were unable to schedule an appointment with a new doctor; even though they are on a Medicare Supplement Plan

I made many phone calls, with my clients to physician offices, in order to fix these issues.

What I found out didn't surprise me.

Many of the staff at physician office's across the country are inadequately trained in the different types of Medicare Plans.

I decided to educate you on how to make an appointment with a physician, lab, hospital, SNF or radiology center, if you have a Medicare Supplement Plan.

Having a Medicare Supplement Plan allows you the freedom to see any physician or provider you want.....,as long as the provider "accepts assignment" with Medicare.

Let's take an example.

If you wanted to make an appointment with a new Cardiologist,

1. call the office you want to be seen in.

2. Tell the person, who is scheduling your appointment, that          Medicare is your Primary Insurance.

3. You may be asked if you have a "secondary insurance." If you are enrolled in a Medicare Supplement Plan, the answer is .... "Yes, I have a Medicare Supplement Plan."

If you are enrolled in a Medicare Advantage Plan, the Medicare Advantage Plan is your "Primary Insurance."

Most likely, you don't have another plan.

When you visit the physician's office for the first time, show the receptionist your Medicare Supplement ID Card. You may be asked if you have your Medicare ID Card. Hopefully, you've made a copy of your Medicare ID Card and have left your original Medicare ID Card at home in a safe place. You shouldn't be carrying your Original Medicare ID Card!

The staff will bill Medicare and the Medicare Supplement Plan for the amount you would have owed, if on Original Medicare.

You should not receive any paperwork to submit to Medicare or a Medicare Insurance Carrier. 

Prior to any physician visits or procedures, call and ask if you have any co-pay, co-insurance or deductible if you are enrolled in a Medicare Supplement Plan that is not designated by the letter "F."

Medicare Supplement Plans are designated by Letters of the Alphabet and those "letter" plans can be offered by many different Insurance Companies. 

Each "lettered" plan pays co-pays, co-insurance or deductibles, on your behalf, based on the plan you select. 

After the physician's staff has your Medicare Supplement Plan info on file, they shouldn't require you to show them your card the next time you come in for an appointment.

Hopefully, this has helped you understand what is going on in the real world, and it will make it a less frustrating place for you!

Thank you for listening to Medicare Nation!

If you are part of my “Sandwich Generation,” Share this show with your parents and/or grandparents. They have many questions about Medicare and this show will answer them! Buy them a “Smart Phone,” and introduce them to Medicare Nation!

If you are a Baby Boomer, share Medicare Nation with other “Baby Boomers.” I want to educate as many of you as I can about Medicare! I certainly can use  your help in putting the word out!

If you have any questions, send them to Support@TheMedicareNation.com

If I can answer it in one email - I will personally answer you!

If your question requires research or additional contact with you, I do offer consulting if you would like me to assist you in that manner.

Want to hear a topic on Medicare Nation? A special guest? Let me know and I'll do my best to get them on the show!

Thanks again for listening!

Mar 3, 2017

Hey Medicare Nation!

Many of you carry your Medicare ID card in your wallet or purse. If you are a Medicare Advantage beneficiary, you have a “separate” medical ID card from the insurance carrier. It is not necessary to carry your Medicare ID card, If you have a Medicare Advantage ID card.

Who should carry their Medicare ID Card?

If the official Medicare program is your “primary” insurance, you should be carrying your Medicare ID card.

Now….. let me discuss with you how you can carry your Medicare ID card in a safer way.

Currently, your Medicare ID Card has your Social Security number on it, with a letter at the end of your Social Security number.  If you have your social security number memorized, take these steps to help prevent “identity theft.”

  1. Make a copy of your Medicare ID Card
  2. Place your original Medicare ID Card in a safe place.
  3. Take a Black Permanent Marker and “black out” all of the numbers of your social security number( except the last four numbers and the letter), on the copy.
  4. Laminate the copy
  5. Put this copy of your Medicare ID card in your wallet or purse.

 

If you are on a Medicare Advantage Plan or a Supplement to Medicare Plan, you should be carrying the Medical ID card the insurance carrier provided you.

If you have a stand-alone prescription drug plan, you will also have a separate card for your prescriptions. You will need to carry this card in your wallet or purse also.

 

How Do I Replace My Medicare ID Card if I Lost it or it Was Stolen?

If you made a copy of your Medicare ID Card like I described above, you won’t have a problem.

You can retrieve your Medicare ID Card from it’s safe place and make a new copy of the card.

If you didn’t make a copy of your Medicare ID Card, you will need to ask the Social Security Administration for a replacement card.

Follow these steps:

You can ask for a Medicare Replacement Card :

  1. Online
  2. By phone
  3. At a local Social Security office location                                                            A.Online
    1. Go to ssa.gov
    2. You’ll see pretty pictures on the home page. On the left side is a picture, with the caption… “Learn What You Can Do Online.”
    3. “Click” on the that photo.
    4. When the next page opens, look down to about the 7th
    5. It will read….”If you get Social Security benefits or have Medicare you can….”
    6. “Click” on that line.
    7. Sign in or Register for a “My Social Security Account.”
    8. 5th line down should read….. “Get a Replacement Medicare Card”
    9. Select – “Replacement Documents” tab.
    10. Fill out the required information.
    11. If the site “accepts” your information, you are all set! You should receive your replacement Medicare Card in 30 – 60 days.
    12. If the site shows any kind of “error” or “red flags,” you will need to physically go down to a local Social Security location.             B. By Phone

                     1. Call 800 - 633 - 4227

                    C. Social Security Office 

                     1. Click on the "Social Security Location" tab and put in your                          zip code to find the nearest location to you.

 

Thanks so much for listening to Medicare Nation!

I appreciate the time you took to listen. If you have a parent or grandparent, who is approaching Medicare age (65) or is already receiving Medicare benefits, help them “Subscribe” to Medicare Nation.

Buy them a Smartphone!

If you buy them an Apple phone…show them the “purple” podcast icon on the phone and how they access Medicare Nation. Once the Medicare Nation page loads….. click on “subscribe.” All current shows will load automatically once a week for them!

If you buy them an Android phone, just go to Google Play and “Search” for the app – “Stitcher.”

Download the Stitcher App.

When you open Stitcher, they will need to sign up with an email address and password.

Once the home page opens, show them how to “swipe” to the left, until they reach the “last page.” This is the “Search” page.

In the “search” bar…. Type in “Medicare Nation.”

Medicare Nation comes right up!

“Click” on the Subscribe button…… they are set!

Help your parents “search” for other types of podcasts they would have an interest in. You will be opening up a brand new world for them and they WILL thank you for it!

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